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OSI-CAN Blogs

Updated: Dec 22, 2021

Remembrance Day is an important day for Veterans as we perform in the ceremonies to remember those who have fallen and those who are still here … But for those with an OSI there comes a multitude of emotions for the entire month. Remembering those who are not there anymore, feeling guilty or emotional about the pain of attending the ceremony amongst a large grouping of people or guilt for not attending at all in order to avoid that pain, feeling emotions related to surviving when others did not, and a host of other reasons. The following article describes how many Veterans end up going through so many issues in November that many take a lot of time in October to steel themselves for the pain in November.

The effects of an OSI cause difficulty for those working to recover from it, especially during the month of November. Knowing this difficulty is not necessarily half the battle as opposed to what they used to say, knowing the problem is coming can be an opportunity to take action to deal with the coming emotions but for many it is a time that is dreaded. Many Veterans end up in crisis during this month be it a crisis of finances, emotions, relationships, or more. Dealing with this time of crisis can be helped by calling for help from any number of resources that are available: 24/7 Crisis / Suicide Hotline: 1-833-456-4566, contacting the Legion www.legion.ca, and there is of course the resources available through OSI-CAN.


Our mission is to inspire hope and contribute to the continuous well-being and recovery process of Veterans and Front Line Protectors across Canada.

We seek to empower and encourage them to strive for recovery through peer and professional support while creating greater public awareness.

We at OSI-CAN do not see PTSD or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder as a Disorder, we see it as an Injury you can recover from. If you are suffering from the symptoms of an Occupational or Operational Stress Injury, then a PTSD or PTSI diagnosis is not required to get our help



The target demographic of OSI-CAN are but are not limited to: former and serving members of the Canadian Armed Forces, Allied Armed Forces, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Frontline Protectors --- which include Municipal Police Services, CN Police Services, Emergency Medical Services, Fire Protection Services, Wildland Firefighters, Hospital Trauma personnel, Nurses, healthcare Workers, Social Workers, Animal Control Officers, Coroners, Indigenous Emergency Management, Victim Services Personnel, Emergency Communications Specialist, Corrections Officers, “Volunteer” First Responders, Conservation Officers, Aboriginal Emergency Services personnel, Tow Truck drivers who clean up accident scenes and their spouses/partners. This demographic was chosen due to the commonality of experiences they share through the service they provide to the country and community. We have a special interest and support volunteer first responders as they are not eligible for programs such as Workers' Compensation.


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Updated: Dec 22, 2021

Always open with a joke …

Ever hear about the toilet that suffered from PTSD?

They told their therapist they've seen some #$%^.


Humour is a major part of learning to cope. It is difficult to smile or enjoy a joke while you are in the middle of a trigger but it is important to find humour in the rest of your life. Don’t rush it, take your time. Just know that when you are able to enjoy a joke even a little, you are beginning to really heal.

Here is some perspective on dark humour from Psychology Today: “We’ve all heard phrases like: we laugh lest we cry; laughter is the best medicine; nothing can withstand the assault of laughter. Laughter has long been considered therapeutic and studies demonstrate that in the face of stress, comedy is a more effective coping strategy than seriousness. And if you’ve ever spent any time around the military, you’ve likely heard a joke or two. Okay, more than two.

Culturally, military members turn often to "gallows humor" or "black humor" to handle the stress of the job. Irreverent reverence is standard operating procedure and the most colorful black humor arises in the direst situations.

Black humor is best described as the kind of humor that treats threatening or disturbing subjects (i.e. death, combat, disease, deformity) with levity or amusement. This humor is typically employed to somehow convey the absurdity, illogicality, or helplessness of a situation. In essence, it juxtaposes a morbid element with a farcical one”. https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/the-debrief/201805/awful-joke-can-feel-pretty-good

The article then described how using ‘Black Humour’, a therapist opened the door for one soldier who could then open up about his experiences because of the joke. Cracking a joke just may be what keeps you from cracking up yourself!

We at OSI-CAN do not see PTSD or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder as a Disorder, we see it as an Injury you can recover from. If you are suffering from the symptoms of an Occupational or Operational Stress Injury, then a PTSD or PTSI diagnosis is not required to get our help.

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Updated: Dec 22, 2021

The people who are licensed to diagnose are psychiatrists and registered psychologists who have the designation APE behind their name. An Authorized Practice Endorsement (APE) is required to communicate a psychological diagnosis in Saskatchewan.


Do I need a formal diagnosis of PTSD to receive counseling therapy?


No, people who suffer from symptoms related to one or more traumatic events may not meet the full diagnostic criteria of PTSD. If you think you are experiencing the symptoms of an OSI/PTSD then seeking help now can mitigate further injury which means counselling is a reasonable option.



Here are some of the symptoms of an OSI (Operational Stress Injury):

  • Intrusive Memories

  • Avoidance

  • Negative changes in thinking and mood

  • Changes in physical and emotional reactions

  • Intensity of symptoms

  • Suicidal ideation


For Further Detail:

Read up on PTSD or OSI in the OSI-CAN Manual


Our mission is to inspire hope and contribute to the continuous well-being and recovery process of Veterans and Front Line Protectors across Canada.

We seek to empower and encourage them to strive for recovery through peer and professional support while creating greater public awareness.

We at OSI-CAN do not see PTSD or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder as a Disorder, we see it as an Injury you can recover from. If you are suffering from the symptoms of an Occupational or Operational Stress Injury, then a PTSD or PTSI diagnosis is not required to get our help



The target demographic of OSI-CAN are but are not limited to: former and serving members of the Canadian Armed Forces, Allied Armed Forces, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Frontline Protectors --- which include Municipal Police Services, CN Police Services, Emergency Medical Services, Fire Protection Services, Wildland Firefighters, Hospital Trauma personnel, Nurses, healthcare Workers, Social Workers, Animal Control Officers, Coroners, Indigenous Emergency Management, Victim Services Personnel, Emergency Communications Specialist, Corrections Officers, “Volunteer” First Responders, Conservation Officers, Aboriginal Emergency Services personnel, Tow Truck drivers who clean up accident scenes and their spouses/partners. This demographic was chosen due to the commonality of experiences they share through the service they provide to the country and community. We have a special interest and support volunteer first responders as they are not eligible for programs such as Workers' Compensation.


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OSI-CAN Target Demographic

The target demographic of OSI-CAN are but are not limited to: former and serving members of the Canadian Armed Forces, Allied Armed Forces, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Frontline Protectors --- Municipal Police Services, CN Police Services, Emergency Medical Services, Fire Protection Services, Wildland Firefighters, Hospital Trauma personnel, Nurses, Healthcare Workers, Crown Prosecutors, Social Workers, Animal Control Officers, Coroners, Indigenous Emergency Management, Victim Services Personnel, Emergency Communications Specialist, Crisis Management Workers (such as Mobile Crisis, etc), Corrections Officers, “Volunteer” First Responders, Conservation Officers, Tow Truck drivers, and private sector First Responders.  Persons who in the performance of their jobs are exposed to criminal acts of Trauma. We also provide supports to the spouses and significant others of those exposed to such trauma.  This demographic was chosen due to the commonality of experiences they share through the service they provide to the country and community. We have a special interest and support volunteer first responders as they may not have proper access to support.

OSI-CAN is a program of:

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In Partnership with:

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With the Support of:

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